YmAbs Therapeutics, Inc. (YMAB) Q3 2020 Earnings Call Transcript

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YmAbs Therapeutics, Inc. (NASDAQ:YMAB)
Q3 2020 Earnings Call
Nov 6, 2020, 9:00 a.m. ET

Contents:

  • Prepared Remarks
  • Questions and Answers
  • Call Participants

Prepared Remarks:

Operator

Good morning, and welcome to the Y-mAbs Therapeutics Incorporated Third Quarter 2020 Earnings Conference Call. [Operator Instructions]

Let me quickly remind you that the following discussion contains certain statements that are considered forward-looking statements as defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Because forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties, they are not guarantees of future performance and actual results may differ materially from those expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements due to a variety of factors, including those risk factors discussed in the Company’s annual report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019, as filed with the SEC on March 12, 2020, and in the Company’s subsequently filed SEC reports.

At this time, I’d like to turn the conference over to Thomas Gad, the Company’s Founder, Chairman and President. Please go ahead, sir.

Thomas GadChairman, Founder, President, Head of Business Development & Strategy

Thank you, Jerry. Good morning, everyone, and thank you for joining us today. So the third quarter of 2020 has been strong for Y-mAbs. We believe we’ve made significant progress on executing our strategy. Naxitamab BLA is currently on the review with the FDA as you know, and the PDUFA date is coming up later this month. Additionally, naxitamab, has a Rare Pediatric Disease Designation, which means we are receiving a Priority Review Voucher if naxitamab is approved.

We’re also expecting to resubmit the omburtamab BLA late 2020 or in the beginning of 2021. In addition, the FDA has cleared our two INDs for the Lutetium labeled next-generation omburtamab, and we expect this exciting compound to enter into the clinic by the end of the year targeting both pediatric, medulloblastoma patients, but also B7-H3 positive brain metastases in adult patients.

We ended the quarter 2020 with approximately $131 million in cash. So we believe we have a strong balance sheet to support the potential commercial launches of both naxitamab and omburtamab, while at the same time, continue to advance the remainder of our development pipeline. We also believe that our cash position should carry us through the end of 2022 without taking into consideration any product sales or potential partnership income, which Bo will elaborate on — later on in this call.

As a company, we continue to work hard to stay true to our precision-oncology field addressing clear unmet medical needs and focusing on advancing our therapies to reach the lives of pediatric patients living with rare disease. Concurrently, I think it’s very exciting to see our pipeline maturing into adult populations, such as lutetium-label omburtamab in adult B7-H3 positive cancers and our GD2 CD3 bispecific, which we anticipate will enter a Phase 2 small cell lung cancer study later this year.

We are also very pleased with the progress of our — both of our tech technology platforms, namely the Y-BiClone bispecific platform, but we also have a CD33xCD3 bispecific plan to go into clinic for pediatric AML patients next year. And our self-assembly/dis-assembly radiopharmaceutical platform, also referred to as SADA or liquid radiation as we like to call that.

Today you will hear remarks from Dr. Claus Moller, our Chief Executive Officer, who will provide a business overview and from Bo Kruse, our Chief Financial Officer on our third quarter financial results.

And I’m pleased to hand over the call to Claus to present. Thank you.

Claus MollerChief Executive Officer

Thank you very much, Thomas, and welcome to Y-mAbs Therapeutics’ third quarter 2020 earnings call. We’re very pleased that you’ve chosen to spend this morning with us. During the third quarter, we have continued to work hard to ensure that our pipeline including our lead candidates naxitamab and omburtamab advance toward the market.

As you know, back in June, the FDA has accepted our BLA for naxitamab for treatment of patients with relapsed-refractory high-risk neuroblastoma for priority review. The FDA set a PDUFA date on November 30, 2020, and the agency also indicated that in the BLA filing communication letter, that it is not currently planning to hold an Advisory Committee Meeting to discuss the application. If approved, we expect that this indication will be approved under accelerated approval based on the overall response rate and duration of response. Continued approval for this indication may then be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in a post-marketing commitment.

We expect that the confirmatory post-marketing clinical trial required to verify and describe clinical benefit will be the Study 201, which is already ongoing. Study 201 will then have to enroll a total of more than 80 patients and make sure overall response rates, ORR, progression-free survival and overall survival. The ORR is the primary endpoint of the study, the progression-free survival and overall survival are secondary endpoints in the long-term follow-up.

Naxitamab has received priority review Orphan Drug Breakthrough Therapy and Rare Pediatric Disease designations from the FDA. And upon potential approval, we believe naxitamab will be a much-needed breakthrough for the patients with relapsed/refractory neuroblastoma, who historically not have had any approved treatment available. At the International Society of Pediatric Oncology Virtual Congress in October this year, otherwise known as SIOP, Dr. Mora, from SJD Barcelona Children’s Hospital presented data from the company’s pivotal 201 multi-center study. The central independent evaluation showed an overall rate of response of 68% and the rate of complete responses was 59% for the 22 patients presented.

In addition, bone marrow clearance was observed with complete response in seven of nine patients who had positive bone marrow at trial start. The median duration of responses for long-term follow-up was at the time of the conference 27 weeks. In addition to BLA — the BLA for naxitamab in relapsed/refractory in neuroblastoma, we have trials ongoing in Barcelona and at Memorial Sloan-Kettering in New York for first line neuroblastoma as well as chemo combination trials for refractory in neuroblastoma patients.

Now turning to omburtamab, our second lead compound, in October, we received a refusal to file letter from the FDA regarding the BLA for omburtamab for the treatment of pediatric patients with CNS leptomeningeal metastases from neuroblastoma. Our BLA was originally submitted in August 2020. Upon its preliminary review, the FDA determined that certain parts of the CMC module and the clinical module of the BLA required further detail. No additional non-clinical data have been requested or are required and it should also be noted that no additional clinical trials of additional patients was requested in the refused to file letter.

Y-mAbs is confident that it can address all points raised by the FDA, including providing the requested additional CMC information and supplementary data from Study 101, which will include response data from patients with evaluable disease among the patients included in protocol 101. In addition, an oral presentation at SIOP Dr. Kim — an oral presentation at SIOP Dr. Kim Kramer from MSK presented interim results for 17 patients enrolled in the company’s pivotal 101 multi-center study. The study showed a 12 month overall survival rate of 87% with a median follow-up of 26 weeks. This compares very favorably to an OS of approximately 30% in a historical control group. The preliminary overall survival data results from the multi-center Study 101 are encouraging and appears almost identical to the results of Study 03-133, which was conducted at Memorial Sloan-Kettering.

While recruitment is still ongoing, we are very pleased to see the preliminary omburtamab data in the multi-center sitting that appears to support the conclusions from the MSK data. We believe the preliminary survival curves are very similar to the original MSK data and this is good news for children with CNS leptomeningeal metastases from neuroblastoma. As previously disclosed, we are also developing omburtamab for Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma, known as DIPG in a Phase 1 study at MSK and we are planning to open a multi-center Phase 2 study for DIPG patients this year. For Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumors, known as DSRCT, we recently opened a Phase 2 study at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering.

Let’s now turn to the lutetium-labeled omburtamab. In October, the FDA-cleared our IND for 177 lutetium omburtamab DTPA for treatment of medulloblastoma, which is one of the most common types of primary brain cancer in children. Medulloblastomas are invasive rapidly growing tumors that unlike most brain tumors spread through the spinal fluid and subsequently metastasize to different locations along the surface of the brain and the spinal cord. 177 lutetium omburtamab DTPA embodies the company’s naked omburtamab antibody radiolabeled with Lutetium 177 using DTPA to chelated lutetium radioisotope to the antibody.

We anticipate that an international multi-center Phase 1/2 clinical trial will be initiated for the screening of pediatric patients with medulloblastoma during this quarter after the opening of the IND and based on our clinical experience with Iodine-131 omburtamab for B7-H3 positive brain metastases, we are obviously excited to see the 177 lutetium construct make its way into the clinic to potentially establish a safety profile and to determine the maximum tolerated dose in these patients. In this study, we hope to leverage our clinical experience from treating 27 medulloblastoma patients with the Iodine-131 omburtamab, again using indwelling catheters for intracerebroventricular drug delivery, also known the Ommaya catheter.

In addition, the FDA has recently cleared our separate IND for a basket trial in B7-H3 positive CNS leptomeningeal metastases cancers in adults, where we hope to leverage our prior experience from treating more than 25 adults with Iodine-131 omburtamab. We expect to initiate the study for the first adult patients to be treated with 177 lutetium omburtamab DTPA during the fourth quarter of 2020, and we are thrilled to widen our clinical reach to include adult indications.

Now let’s talk about nivatrotamab, our GD2-CD3 bispecific antibody. In September, the FDA granted Orphan Drug Designation and Rare Pediatric Disease Designation to our leading bispecific antibody nivatrotamab for the treatment of neuroblastoma. Nivatrotamab is a humanized anti GD2 bispecific antibody in a Phase 1/2 clinical development in collaboration with MSK in patients with relapsed/refractory neuroblastoma as well as high-grade osteosarcoma and other GD2 positive solid tumors where patients have relapsed or are refractory to previously known standard therapy.

We plan to expand the ongoing study of nivatrotamab into two separate Phase 2 arms, one in neuroblastoma and one in osteosarcoma as well as initiating a separate Phase II multi-center study in small cell lung cancer. We expect to submit an IND for the lung cancer study during the fourth quarter of 2020 and we are excited to widen nivatrotamab’s clinical leads to include adult patients also.

Turning to the commercial aspect, we are giving the small universe of pediatric cancer centers that treat the majority of the neuroblastoma patients, we believe that we have built a lean and highly targeted commercial organization ahead of the launch of both naxitamab and omburtamab, if approved. Assuming approval of naxitamab, our commercial team is in place and ready to launch naxitamab within a few weeks of its approval in the U.S., and we believe we are also well positioned for the launch of omburtamab, if approved in the U.S. The European marketing application for omburtamab is potentially only a few months behind the U.S. and we plan to begin staffing our European commercial organization in the next few months.

And then onto our exciting SADA technology, as you will recall, in April, we entered into an agreement with the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and Massachusetts Institute of Technology for our worldwide exclusive license and research collaboration to develop antibody constructs based on the SADA Radioimmunotherapy platform. The SADA technology’s two step payload delivery has been shown in an in vitro setting to shrink or to completely eliminate tumors also in vivo in animals, while other tissues were spared. No clearing agent was needed and no significant toxicity to the bone marrow, kidneys or liver tissues were observed. We believe that the SADA technology may allow for rapid clearance of the compound, while maintaining high target offtake, and thereby causing less immunogenicity.

In addition, the SADA technology appears to be modular led by any total modified radioactive payload combined with any therapeutic antibody seems possible. We are excited about the prospects of the SADA technology and thus far we have announced four SADA targets in preclinical development. This includes our newest construct B7-H3 SADA, which we intend to use for treatment of prostate cancer. We plan to submit the first IND for our SADA construct in the second half of 2021 and we have high hopes to see liquid radiation transforms today’s cancer treatments.

Finally, a few more general comments, to support our growth plans we increased our headcount about — by 25 to a total of 114 employees during the quarter. Due to the recruitment of sales force and supporting functions, the increase is significant compared to recent quarters. With a PDUFA date of naxitamab coming later this month and the planned resubmission of the omburtamab BLA coming up, we believe that we are well positioned to transform Y-mAbs into a commercial state company. Concurrently, we plan to widen and deepen our pipeline by advancing our antibody constructs through the clinic predominantly the SADA constructs, the bispecifics and the next generation omburtamab radiolabeled antibodies.

With this now let me turn over to Bo and invite him to share his remarks on the second quarter financials. Bo?

Bo KruseChief Financial Officer, Treasurer, Secretary

Thank you. Claus. We reported net loss for the quarter ended September 30, 2020, of $32.8 million or $0.82 per share basic and diluted comparing to a net loss of $23.9 million or $0.70 per share basic and diluted for the quarter ended September 30, 2019. We ended the third quarter with a cash position of $131 million compared with 2019 year-end cash position of $207 million. As our work on the omburtamab BLA submission has progressed through the quarter and as we have continued to accelerate the commercial ramp up for the potential launches of naxitamab and omburtamab, we’ve seen our cash burn increase. We expect that the cash burn from operating expenses for the fourth quarter in 2022 to increase slightly, but remain roughly in line with the third quarter.

As we take a closer look at the operating expenses for the third quarter, we note that research and development expenses have increased by $1.3 million from $19.7 million for the quarter ended September 30, 2019, to $21 million for the quarter ended September 30, 2020. This increase was primarily attributable to a $2.4 million increase in personnel cost, $0.5 million increase in clinical trials, and $0.4 million increase in professional and consulting fees. These increases were partially offset by a decrease of $2 million in outsourced manufacturing costs.

G&A expenses increased by $6.9 million from $4.7 million for the quarter ended September 30, 2019, to $11.6 million for the quarter ended September 30, 2020. The increase in G&A expenses primarily reflected $2.2 million increase in personnel cost, $3.2 million increase in expenses for the building of our commercial infrastructure related to the potential launch of our two lead product candidates naxitamab and omburtamab and $1.6 million for business insurance and professional fees.

Cash used in operating activities as per September 2020 show that the cash burn increased by $24.6 million from $48.9 million for the nine-months period ended September 30, 2019, to $73.5 million for the period ended September 30, 2020. The increase was primarily caused by the increase in the net loss for the period. The net loss itself increased by $41.5 million for the period ended September 30, 2020 and was partially offset by an increase in non-cash expenses, including depreciation and stock-based compensation of $16.9 million.

If naxitamab receives approval from the FDA we’ll receive our first PRV. Under the terms of the MSK license agreement, we are obliged to monetize the PRV and share the net proceeds thereof if any with MSK who will receive 40% of the net proceeds and the remaining 60% is going to us. We’ve entered into an engagement letter with a leading institution in the field of monetizing PRVs and assuming FDA approval of naxitamab expect to complete the transaction either late 2020 on the beginning of 2021. It’s worth noting that we also have received Rare Pediatric Disease Designations for omburtamab, nivatrotamab and the GD2-GD3 vaccine. So upon the potential approval of these compounds we will have another three PRVs coming.

In terms of financial guidance, since the secondary offering last year, we’ve said that the cash on hand would cover our operating expenses and capital expenditures through the fourth quarter of 2022. This does take into account the potential net proceeds for monetization of naxitamab and broaden our PRVs, but does not taking into account any revenues we may receive from the commercialization of either naxitamab or omburtamab upon the potential approval or the proceeds we may receive from any potential future partnerships. So we continue to believe Y-mAbs remains in a very healthy financial position.

This concludes the financial update and I’ll now turn the call over to Thomas.

Thomas GadChairman, Founder, President, Head of Business Development & Strategy

Thank you, Bo. Okay, this concludes the remarks of our — prepared remarks today. I think at this time, we will let the call go over for questions to Jerry. And let’s open up any Q&A session we have right now. Thank you.

Questions and Answers:

Operator

[Operator Instructions] Our first question is from Robert Burns, H.C. Wainwright. Please go ahead, sir.

Robert BurnsH.C. Wainwright & Co. LLC — Analyst

Hi, guys. Thanks for taking my questions, and congrats on the quarter. Three from me right now, if I may. So for the first one, one of the reasons cited by the FDA for those reasons to file letter was that they requesting to like evidence of anti-tumor activity. I mean, i.e., response rate data before proceeding with the filing?

Now, unfortunately, we do not see any response rate data from the Phase 2 multi-center study of omburtamab presented at SIOP, despite of being a secondary endpoint. Can you provide any color as the level of response seen in that trial? And isn’t FDA looking for a minimum specific response level here?

Claus MollerChief Executive Officer

So yeah. Let me start, I was replying to this. Well, we have not presented the data yet and we are discussing to what levels and how much the FDA want to see. I can assure you that we are definitely having the group of the patients that are showing measurable disease and that we are seeing responses in these patients.

It looks like right now that maybe about 40% of the patient has measurable disease, but it’s still a little early to say how many we will be able to take measurable disease and prevention tumor response are. But we are definitely seeing responses and I’m feeling comfortable that the level of responses we will be able to present will be satisfactory to the FDA when we agree on all the details as to refiling.

Robert BurnsH.C. Wainwright & Co. LLC — Analyst

Okay, thanks. So my second question is around lutetium 177-labeled omburtamab. Now considering that lutetium 177’s maximum data particle energy is not — it doesn’t seem that much lower than Iodine-131. How reusable do you believe it is that you may see a relatively similar efficacy benefit between the 177-labeled omburtamab as compared to the one Iodine-131 labeled omburtamab? And what does the market sizes look like for the B7-H3 positive medulloblastoma as well as the B7-H3 positive CNS mets tumors in adult patients?

Claus MollerChief Executive Officer

Well, I mean, the lutetium is correct, it has an entity of about 80% of the electrons of the lutetium that are thrown off. Is about 80% of the energy of electrons drawn-off and iodine. so they are pretty similar. Half-life of the two isotopes also pretty similar, five to six days for the lutetium and maybe seven days for the iodine. And so, that also tells you that the penetration in tissues is almost like in the same ballpark with lutetium maybe be about 70%, 80% penetration and damaging versus iodine. And therefore, we believe that it should be possible also to up the dose a little bit of the lutetium versus the Iodine-131.

Big benefit is that it’s a lot easier to radiolabel with the lutetium on a DTPA related antibody construct. Size of the market, I mean it’s very difficult, but for the adults, for the pediatrics, the medulloblastoma is about 350 kids per year in the U.S. So that’s the ballpark size of the medulloblastoma indication, but the adult indication, we are looking at tens of thousands of patients per year dying from CNS leptomeningeal metastasis with B7-H3 positive cancers.

Robert BurnsH.C. Wainwright & Co. LLC — Analyst

Okay, thanks for that, Claus. Last one from me and then I’ll hop back in the queue. So given the proximity to an FDA approval for naxitamab and relapsed/refractory neuroblastoma, could you discuss a little bit more in detail now how you’re currently viewing the regulatory path and timeline for potential label expansion into the frontline setting as well as for the HITS protocol?

Claus MollerChief Executive Officer

Yeah, well, I think the — what we have said all along and what I’m still saying is let the FDA approve naxitamab then the idea is to ask for a Type B meeting and go back and discuss what do they need to see for frontline study. And then, so let’s have that Type B meeting with the agency after we have gotten the approval. And — but as you know, we have two single-center ongoing frontline studies already. We have already presented the first set of data from Dr. Mora frontline study about 11 months ago. And the MSK study is almost completely enrolled, it’s supposed to enroll 59 patients. And so, very soon we should also have data for that.

So when we go through the FDA, we’ll be able to bring data from two separate clinical studies in frontline and ask them about the potential design of a multi-center-phased frontline study Phase 2 and find out what more do they need to see. But as I said, let’s get the approval for naxitamab in second-line. And I think also with the chemo combination, that’s also a discussion, we would like to have with the FDA for them to expand the label into a chemo combination what more is needed.

Because we also, as you know, we have a combination study with irinotecan, temozolomide and GMCSF, and naxitamab at both MSK. And again, a single-center study in Spain investigator sponsored by Dr. Mora. So — and we are planning for additional studies in that setting also. So that’s why we are now — we need to talk to the FDA, get clear regulatory guidance from their side rather than us second-guessing what they actually need. But we have data and we’re definitely planning to meet and get that.

Robert BurnsH.C. Wainwright & Co. LLC — Analyst

Awesome. Thank you Claus. I’ll hop in the queue now. Congrats, again.

Claus MollerChief Executive Officer

Thanks.

Operator

The next question is from David Leibowitz, Morgan Stanley. Please go ahead, sir.

David LebowitzMorgan Stanley — Analyst

Thank you very much for taking my question. Given that naxitamab is going to be potentially launched very soon, could you just run us through, I guess, what we should look for in an initial launch, what type of, I guess, revenue growth could we see, taking in the first market opportunities is clearly on the smaller side and what your sales organization looks like at this point?

Claus MollerChief Executive Officer

Sure. I mean, as you know, David, most companies are very cautious on predicting on sales when launching a new product and so are we. Having said that, we know there is about 300 kids a year that our primary or secondary refractory neuroblastoma patients and right now they don’t have any approved therapy. So those are the ones that we are going to start taking into and making our customers. But how many we will reach, let’s get the product approved, we will launch and let’s see how it develops in the first year.

But we are definitely very excited, we have very strong expectations, we also have a very strong collaboration with Memorial Sloan-Kettering still, as you can hear from everything that I think every second paragraph, I was using that almost one reference to collaborations with MSK and they are very committed to using naxitamab and have been using it both in front-line and second-line and third-line for neuroblastoma patients and in various combination or as monotherapy for the last five years. So they would obviously continue doing that even if naxitamab becomes a commercial product rather than a clinical development program.

So in terms of the sales team, we have our 10 people in the sales organization, those that actually are responsible for visiting doctors, they are all in place, we have our medical science license and research nurse team also set up and ready to go and of course the whole additional support organization with the market access and marketing and co-pay, etc., all this has also been set up and are ready to go. So everybody is extremely excited these days and continuously monitoring for any final and new development. And I’m very confident that we are very close to a potential marketing authorization for naxitamab.

David LebowitzMorgan Stanley — Analyst

Thank you for that. And looking over to the omburtamab franchise, could you just, I guess, discuss the the challenges of having such a therapy being prescribed by, I guess, radio-pharmacies at the hospitals and how that dynamic could differ between the iodine and the lutetium version?

Claus MollerChief Executive Officer

Well, I think it’s more kind of a productivity issue. Right now, what we are planning for and as part of our BLA are suggesting is that we are responsible for the radiolabeling of the omburtamab with iodine. So that means that our central radio labeling is happening, we are releasing the ready-to-use product with the potential use within 72 hours. And so the only thing the radiopharmacy at the hospital need to do and that is a requirement for the hospital, they need to have a radiopharmacy, but any large hospitals in the U.S. has that and definitely, all the hospitals treating pediatric oncology.

So the only thing that the radiation pharmacy needs to do is to receive the radiolabeled antibody into the led box and check and control everything and pull out the radioisotope — radiolabeled antibody from the vial in a syringe that contains the dosed, the prescribed dose with a 50 milligri [Phonetic] radioactive Iodine and then put that in a different led box and send it out to the department and then they are ready to inject. So it’s very simple, there is no tricky steps, they don’t need to do anything, but check that what they are receiving is what they ordered and make sure that the total amount they drag up in the syringe is equivalent to 50 milligri of radioisotope antibody and that’s it.

If we look at the lutetium, it’s going to be exactly the same. We will deliver ready to use lutetium labeled antibody and the dose and the — typically the vial will contain maybe 80 to 90 milligri of radioactively labeled antibody and it will have a prescription saying that X microliters of this solution contains Y milligri and then the radio-pharmacist responsible if the patient is prescribed 50 milligri, they will take that dose out of the vial and the rest is discarded by the radiopharmacy.

The lutetium is exactly the same. They will just have X amount of our lutetium labeled antibody in the vial, but for us as a company, it takes about 1.5 hour to radiolabel the antibody and quality check it and put it in a vial, pack it and ship it off. Whereas when we radiolabel the lutetium it takes 15 seconds. So it’s a much easier radiolabeling process and we don’t need to double-check that it’s still has the necessary binding affinity because it’s — lutetium never affect the binding affinity of the antibody, at least until what we know today, but it’s giving good reasons because the challenge with the omburtamab iodine is that the iodine is known for sometimes destructing the binding side of the antibody, because one of the tyrosine is sitting pretty close to the binding side.

Now it becomes technically — so to summarize, shortly it’s a lot easier for us to radiolabel with lutetium, it’s a more stable product and therefore we can ship it out to tens of thousands of patients every year. Whereas iodination it’s definitely doable to send out a couple of thousand vials per year and you could probably scale it up a bit more, but it’s just much easier with lutetium construct.

Robert BurnsH.C. Wainwright & Co. LLC — Analyst

Thank you for that. Appreciate it.

Operator

The next question is from Etzer Darout, Guggenheim. Please go ahead, sir.

Etzer DaroutGuggenheim — Analyst

Great, thanks for taking the question. Just a couple for me, the first, maybe if you could elaborate a little bit on the Type-A meeting with the FDA on omburtamab and what’s you positive takeaways from that interaction with respect to sort of the refiling of the BLA? And I have a second question.

Claus MollerChief Executive Officer

Sure. I mean, it’s pretty clear that on the CMC we have resolved all the issues that they have requested and we are ready to put that together in a resubmission package. There are still some issues, we need additional clarification on, in terms of level of response rate and number of patients they want to see response rates from. And they and us are still discussing it, we are putting a briefing package together for them to be resubmitted next week.

So we are on the track, as we have set to get everything put together and I’m very confident that we will be able to do that. That was referring to the Type-A meeting, your other question was?

Etzer DaroutGuggenheim — Analyst

Yeah. So the other question was on the bispecific programs. I guess, first with the GD2 bispecific testing the obligatory question as to when we may be able to see sort of the initial data? And then on the CD33 T-cell engage, any potential differentiation that you are seeing preclinically from other programs and maybe some color there?

Claus MollerChief Executive Officer

I think it’s too early for us to give any details on that. I think, we had said that we are trying to see if we can present data on company science day update that we hope to hold in December this year. So don’t hold your breaths for it, but look forward to the company update in December, where we hopefully can provide the first datasets from the bispecific antibody study.

Etzer DaroutGuggenheim — Analyst

Great, thank you.

Operator

We have a question from Alec Stranahan, Bank of America. Please go ahead.

Alec StranahanBank of America Merrill Lynch — Analyst

Hey, guys. Thanks for the update and for taking our questions. Just two from me, first with the studies from omburtamab DTPA getting under way, can you just help us frame whether there are any unique differences in these expanded patient population omburtamab 131 in the pediatric setting in terms of limitations with delivery method or preference for individual tumor types in the adult study? And, I guess, along those lines, do you see the intracerebroventricular administration may be capping expansion into some of these larger patient population?

And secondly for naxitamab and front-line neuroblastoma how compelling for physicians and patients do you see removing the need for standard ASCT in this setting? And do you think this alone could be enough for clinical adoption? Thanks.

Claus MollerChief Executive Officer

Let — Alec, let’s start with the first question about the omburtamab DTPA, and we can get back to your second one. So you are asking about the DTPA and as I said the medulloblastoma as I also reported earlier is an indication where we already have seen some indications of efficacy in 03-133 study where we treated already 27 patients with medulloblastoma. And so we are kind of looking at this as a very important setting and rather than using in the neuroblastoma patients, where we already are achieving very great results, we wanted to see if there was a possibility to further increase the dosing and the efficacy of omburtamab in a population, where we are seeing clear signals of efficacy. And therefore, it was a nice and perfect fast track path for the omburtamab-DTPA lutetium from a development perspective to go on with the medulloblastoma. We have clinical evidence from the iodinated form, and we have a group of patients with an unmet medical need and we are staying true to our commitment to develop pediatric oncology compounds. So that made a lot of sense and is also attracting quite a bit of interest from pediatric brain tumor consortias in the U.S. to participate in that development.

And yes, expanding with this construct, the DTPA conjugated omburtamab into the adult setting is clearly going to increase the number of patients. Will they — will the Maya catheter the instrumental to our catheter be a limiting fact. I don’t think so, I think any neurosurgeon in both Europe and the U.S. is perfectly skilled in placing these catheters. And it’s kind of like in my opinion, just a CNS port-a-cath. And any surgeon can put in a port-a-cath and any neurosurgeon can put in a Maya catheter.

So I don’t foresee that being a limiting issue and there’s almost never any issues because the reservoir was placed under the skin, so you don’t have infection risks from the outside. So it seems as it’s a pretty safe and clear possible way forward for these constructs. That was the omburtamab question and you had a question about naxitamab also?

Alec StranahanBank of America Merrill Lynch — Analyst

Right. Yeah. The first-line, ASCT and whether this is sufficient for clinical adoption hold on [Phonetic] in your view.

Bo KruseChief Financial Officer, Treasurer, Secretary

The first line — I’m not sure I understand the question.

Alec StranahanBank of America Merrill Lynch — Analyst

Right. So first-line neuroblastoma, I guess, how…

Bo KruseChief Financial Officer, Treasurer, Secretary

Yeah.

Alec StranahanBank of America Merrill Lynch — Analyst

Compelling would be removing the need for standard ASCT setting?

Bo KruseChief Financial Officer, Treasurer, Secretary

I think, my take on this is that if we can show that we have similar long-term, call it two year eventually survival with naxitamab and we can show that we have a significant reduction in the hospitalization and the use of morphine when treating front-line neuroblastoma patients with naxitamab versus dinutuximab it’s pretty well established what that days of hospitalization and the use of morphine is for, which patients in front-line treated with dinutuximab.

And if we can show that the number of hospitalization days goes from 35 to 40 days per type cycle treatment goes down from that to less than three days, which we know we have less than one day on average with naxitamab. And at the same time, the total use of morphine goes down from 8 times to 0.25 times. I mean, we have shown, I would — what I would consider clear clinical benefit. If there’s — even if there is no significant difference in side effect profile. And I think, you will see that the side effect profile although, we of course also see side effects, hypertension and pain with naxitamab compared to the amount of side effects you see when giving dinutuximab in front-line in combination with IL-2, which is the indication that they have is significantly lower.

So I think that’s — what would it take to be compelling? As I said, significant reduction and use of morphine and hospitalization and serious adverse events. And at the same time, same level of two-year event-free survival. And two-year event-free survival is pretty well established for without GD2 antibody 40% to 45%, two-year event-free survival with dinutuximab 60% to 65%. And the only data we have seen so far is a Dr. Mora’s two-year event-free survival of about 70%. So — and that was on his first 37 patients. And I consider that compelling.

Alec StranahanBank of America Merrill Lynch — Analyst

Thank you.

Claus MollerChief Executive Officer

Great.

Operator

We have a question from Anupam Rama, J.P. Morgan. Please go ahead, sir.

Anupam RamaJ.P. Morgan — Analyst

Hi, guys. Thanks so much for taking the question, and congrats on all the progress. Just a quick clarification question on the GD2-GD3 vaccine. Sorry, if I missed it in the opening comments, but the Phase 2 trial in neuroblastoma is supposed to start in the first quarter of next year, right? So what are the gating factors to starting the study? Thanks so much.

Claus MollerChief Executive Officer

Yeah, we are still looking at the combination with the betaglycan that they have been using and discussing with MSK, both the sourcing of the betaglycan and eventual need for that. And — but besides that, there are no major gating factors and we are also discussing with patient organization about a — the first study we are looking at is to start a study in second CR, there’s clearly an interest of participating in a front-line study from patient organizations with the vaccine where you randomize between vaccine and placebo. But besides all the other things that we also need to do, I don’t see any significant gating factors.

Anupam RamaJ.P. Morgan — Analyst

Great, thanks so much for taking my question.

Operator

The next question is from Peter Lawson, Barclays. Please go ahead, sir.

Peter LawsonBarclays — Analyst

Hey. I like the pronunciation of my name become more European. So it’s Peter Lawson, Barclays. And just on — I may have missed this, I apologize, as well. So the initial data further GD2-CD3 bispecific, is that going to be at your potential R&D Day and like what could we see with that be patient responses at that point?

Claus MollerChief Executive Officer

As we said, I don’t have any data that I’ve seen yet, but it’s our plan to see how much we can drag out of the database and have it available for our update — scientific update in December.

Peter LawsonBarclays — Analyst

Okay. And then just on the Reiner [Phonetic] criteria data for omburtamab, the FDA requested. Would we see that as well at some point?

Claus MollerChief Executive Officer

I definitely plan to see if we can present it at the Scientific Update Day also, we cannot disclose it before.

Peter LawsonBarclays — Analyst

And that would be at scientific conference, not at your R&D Day?

Claus MollerChief Executive Officer

No, I think we will try to — because I know that there is such a big interest for what we have available. So we will probably try to see if we can communicate at least preliminary evaluations of that. But as I said, it’s — and I don’t think it would be fair to wait. So if we haven’t said anything before I would definitely try to see if we can present what we have available at the Scientific Update Day.

Peter LawsonBarclays — Analyst

Got you. Thank you. And then, how should we think about the cash runway just with series of launches and the potential monetization of vouchers?

Claus MollerChief Executive Officer

I’ll let Bo answer that question.

Bo KruseChief Financial Officer, Treasurer, Secretary

Yeah. So, frankly, Peter, I didn’t hear your question, I was just making some of the notes.

Claus MollerChief Executive Officer

On the financial runway.

Peter LawsonBarclays — Analyst

On the cash runway, just with the potential launches and then the monetization of the vouchers, how should we think about…

Bo KruseChief Financial Officer, Treasurer, Secretary

Yeah.

Peter LawsonBarclays — Analyst

The runway?

Bo KruseChief Financial Officer, Treasurer, Secretary

So basically, the launches themselves as they happen would of course require some funding. Despite of that, we are good through the end of 2022, including only our current cash position and the net proceeds from monetization of the two PRVs on naxitamab and omburtamab. So when we say that we are good through the end of 2022, it’s excluding the product revenues and any income from potential partnerships.

Peter LawsonBarclays — Analyst

Thanks so much. Thanks for taking my questions.

Bo KruseChief Financial Officer, Treasurer, Secretary

Welcome.

Operator

We have a follow-on question from Robert Burns, H.C. Wainwright. Please go ahead, sir.

Robert BurnsH.C. Wainwright & Co. LLC — Analyst

Hey, guys. One more question from me. So given the advantages of also allowing for scintigraphy and subsequent dosimetry with the lutetium-labeled omburtamab, in addition to the manufacturing event that you guys would have with that asset you envisions potentially developing the lutetium-labeled omburtamab in a manner with which you could potentially replace RR-131 omburtamab in the indications that 131 is going after?

Claus MollerChief Executive Officer

Well, I mean, it’s a fair question. I think in the end, it’s uphill to start doing a new study in the leptomeningeal metastasis from neuroblastoma or even in DIPG where we already have more than 40 patients on this study and we are starting a Phase 2 multi-center study in DIPG before year-end, this year. So I do not foresee that. I foresee that we will have primarily the omburtamab DTPA lutetium for the adults and we will keep for the first indications because you know as well as I do, we are just starting Phase I/2 studies now with omburtamab DTPA. So we are looking at something that potentially could come to the market. I mean, if we are really world record setters in developing new drugs, six, seven years from now, we could have the product in the market and omburtamab hopefully comes to the market next year.

So I do not foresee planning to substitute omburtamab in the first indications that we’re getting approval for with the iodinated version with anything for the next six to seven years. And if you know what you’re doing six to seven years from now do let me know because I don’t know what I’m doing six to seven years from now.

Robert BurnsH.C. Wainwright & Co. LLC — Analyst

Thanks for answering the question and congrats, again.

Claus MollerChief Executive Officer

Okay. Thanks, again.

Operator

There are no further questions at this time. I’d like to turn the conference back over to management for closing remarks.

Thomas GadChairman, Founder, President, Head of Business Development & Strategy

Well, thank you everyone for dialing in and participating and look forward to continuing Y-mAbs and have a great weekend. Thank you. That concludes the call.

Operator

[Operator Closing Remarks]

Duration: 48 minutes

Call participants:

Thomas GadChairman, Founder, President, Head of Business Development & Strategy

Claus MollerChief Executive Officer

Bo KruseChief Financial Officer, Treasurer, Secretary

Robert BurnsH.C. Wainwright & Co. LLC — Analyst

David LebowitzMorgan Stanley — Analyst

Etzer DaroutGuggenheim — Analyst

Alec StranahanBank of America Merrill Lynch — Analyst

Anupam RamaJ.P. Morgan — Analyst

Peter LawsonBarclays — Analyst

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